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Tuesday, 21 April 2015

Fight Jihad and End up With Reincarnation

Few enter into Paradise. Not even the ardent Jihadist gets a free ticket into the gardens of Paradise. Some are sent back down to the earth to relive their lives again. Believe it or not!

Check this out!

From Bukhari, Volume 9;

7463. Narrated Abu Hurairah Allah's Messenger said, "Allah guarantees (the person who carries out Jihad in His Cause, and nothing compelled him to go out but Jihad in His Cause and the belief in His Word (i.e. in Allah's religion of Islamic Monotheism) that He will either admit him into Paradise (martyrdom) or return him to his residence from where he started, with reward or booty he has earned."

God sends the jihadist back to the earth, "return him to his residence from where he started". Well, he started from the earth living in the human flesh. So he will be returned back here on the earth. Luckily the booty gained during the first life will be with him in the next reincarnation on the earth.

The jihadists who enter Paradise have their souls inside "green birds" where they fly around Paradise perching themselves on the Kaba next to God. They beg God to be of those who return to the earth. So you must conclude it is possible for God to send you back down again if these righteous souls are begging to come back again.

He said, ‘We asked about that and the Prophet [saw] said, “Their souls are inside the bodies of green birds, who live in lanterns suspended from the Throne, roaming freely in Jannah where they please, then taking shelter in those lanterns. Their Lord cast a glance at them and said, ‘Do you wish for anything?’ They said, ‘What shall more shall we desire when we eat the fruit of Jannah and roam freely in Jannah where we please?’ Their Lord again asked them thrice. When they saw that they would be continued to be asked, they said, ‘Oh Lord! We wish that You would return our souls to our bodies so that we might fight for Your sake once again.’ When Allah saw that they had no need, they were left (to their joy in Heaven.) [Muslim, at-Tirmidhi, an-Naa'i and Ibn Majah]

The idea the soul returns to a bird in Paradise is not a new concept. It also shared within Judaism and other religious texts.

From the Jewish Encyclopedia:

Birds as Souls:

In Psalm xi. 1 the soul is compared to a bird: "Flee as a bird to your mountain." As living beings which move and fly through the air, birds have suggested themselves at all times and in all lands to primitive man as images of the soul, the name for which in most languages is taken from breathing ("nefesh," "neshamah,"="anima," or "psyche"); the soul was represented in the form of a butterfly, as illustrated by the tombs of the early Christians (Aringhi, "Roma Subterranea Novissima," ii. 324). The soul of the king of Egypt was pictured on the monuments as a bird; and the genius ("frawashi") of the kings of Assyria and Persia retained the wings of the bird (Rawlinson, "Herodotus," ii. 105, note 1; idem, "Ancient Monarchies," ii. 28, iii. 353; compare also Simrock, "Handbuch der Deutschen Mythologie," p. 461).

The Arabs also regarded the soul as a bird, and believed that after death it hovered at times around the body, screeching like an owl (Mas'udi, "Les Prairies d'Or," iii. 310, Paris, 1864; Sprenger, "Das Leben Mohammeds," i. 358, note; Kremer, "Gesch. der Herrschenden Ideen des Islams," 1868, pp. 166 et seq.). This view was shared by the Jews. They believed that all souls are gathered in a great cage or treasure-house in heaven, a columbarium, called "Guf"; and so Rabbi Assi teaches that the Messiah, the son of David, can not come until all the souls have been taken out of the Guf, and have gone through human bodies (Yeb. 62a, 63b; Niddah 13b; and elsewhere). In the Greek Baruch Apocalypse (ch. x.), Baruch sees in the fourth heaven a lake full of birds, and is told that these are the souls of the righteous, who continually sing the praise of God. These stories are repeated by Christian saints who affirm having seen the souls of the righteous in the shape of doves in paradise (M. R. James, in "Texts and Studies," v., lxix.; idem, in "Anecdota Græco-Byzantina," p. 181, quoted in Kautzsch, "Die Apokryphen und Pseudepigraphen des Alten Testaments," p. 455).

The souls of the righteous which dwell in the Acherusian lake were consulted as God's counselors at the creation of man, according to Gen. R. 8, having their parallel in the Zendavesta ("Bundahish," ii. 10; Mihir Yast xxv. in "Sacred Books of the East," xxiii. 145).

In the Zohar the sparrow and the swallow, spoken of in Ps. lxxxiv. 3, are compared to the souls of the righteous which dwell in paradise, exactly as are those mentioned in the Baruch Apocalypse. Three times a year, in Nisan and Tishri, they rise upon the walls of paradise and sing the praise of the Master of the universe; whereupon they are ushered into the palace where the Messiah is hidden, called the great "Souls' Nest." They are adorned with crowns in his honor when he appears to them, and from beneath the altar of heaven, where dwell the souls of the righteous, they prepare the erection of the Temple of the future (Zohar ii. 7b, iii. 196b). Grätz ("Gesch. der Juden," vii. 9) failed to see that this rests on an old tradition.

It is customary among German Jews, when a death occurs, to open a window in order that the soul may fly away like a bird (compare Liebrecht, "Zur Volkskunde," 1879 p. 371). On birds around God's throne see Merkabah.

Now what would you prefer to live again on the earth or to be a green bird of Paradise?

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